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Perfect weather turns Vidalia onion crop around, second half yields and quality are ‘phenomenal’

vidalvidAs the Vidalia onion season started in mid-April, growers feared they had a disaster on their hands. With seed stem bolting through the crop, it appeared that as much as half the Vidalia deal would disappear. For the first half of the season those projections were correct. But perfect weather for second-half Vidalias has flushed the seed stem issue from the fields and size, yields and quality are tremendous.

In fact, some growers say second-half volume will actually make up for volume lost in the first half of the season.

“We look to have a very strong storage crop that will last us well into the months of June, July and August. We look to have no problems filling up our storage,” said Troy Bland, director of quality control and procurement for Bland Farms in Glennville, GA. “We’re going to put just as many onions in storage as we would if we didn’t have the seed stem issue. I think a lot of people got scared of the seed stem issue at the beginning of the season. What we are bringing in has been phenomenal quality. The quality this year has been the best we’ve seen in a couple of years.”

The early news pushed some retailers off the Vidalia deal. Those who persevered have been rewarded. Those who did not can now promote Vidalias with confidence.

“Some true Vidalia retailers didn’t get scared, but some of them are and they backed off the promotion,” said John Williams of Herndon Farms in Lyons, GA. “We’ve got a heck of a crop to market now and over the next three months promotions need to be as big as they can – don’t go anywhere else for onions because we’ve got plenty of them.”

Torrential rains led to an outbreak of seed stem, which causes onions to bolt and go to seed. Once harvested, the stem rots quickly and the heart of the onion follows. But when the rains abated the result was “perfect growing conditions for the second half of our crop,” Williams said. “There is absolutely no disease pressure and the onions really sized up, there are a lot of jumbos and colossals. It’s really made up for the [first-half] losses.”

Said John Shuman of Shuman Produce in Reidsville, GA, “May 5 we’re sitting in church on Sunday morning, the sun came out, you could see it through the stained glass windows and it has shined every day since. It’s been windy, it’s been hot, just perfect conditions — you couldn’t have ordered them up any better. The onions have really responded, they are bright, they look good, quality is very high and we’re very excited about the turnaround. The early losses we had predicted are being diluted right now with really high yields on our mid- to late-season varieties and things are really looking up. I think you’re going to see a very good summer season for Vidalia onions with good availability and a stable, steady market.”

The tremendous second-half volume will allow Vidalia growers to extend their storage crop well beyond initial projections and through the summer months.

“It’s a high-quality crop and a lot more onions are going into storage than any of us ever felt like there would be; we have been really blessed,” Shuman said. “As a result of all of that the market has come off a little bit and it’s at a price range now that retailers can really get behind and promote it. The quality is here. The industry’s got enough storage onions available to supply their needs all summer.”

Added Williams, “People thought this was going to be a short crop and we thought we could be out of Vidalia by end of July, but I think we’re going to have Vidalias until the end of August, so the season will definitely be extended. We knew we had a pretty good crop on the back end but we’ve been blown away with these yields. Now we just have a lot of onions to sell.”

Young company aims for growth by staying hands-on

kelvidKelly Bros. Inc. out of Exeter, CA, is an up-and-coming fruit company devoted to working hands-on with its suppliers and customers. The company is just three years old and has built a devoted customer base of fruit processors and distributors across the United States.

"We understand our clients’ business models and have proven success through research and development, and year-round support. It is our job as a team to share industry knowledge, ensure successful transactions, and control the amount of product needed seasonally," President Patrick Kelly said.

This hands-on approach to all aspects of fruit processing and relationship building with growers and clients has served Kelly and his company well. Kelly Bros.' pursuit of consistency of product has produced consistent relationships with growers and buyers, which it hopes to extend to new outlets.

California Giant Berry Farms signs on with FoodLink

cgflIn March, California Giant Berry Farms, based in Watsonville, CA, agreed to use FoodLink, a commerce and traceability platform, for item-specific tracking on all of its strawberries grown in the United States.

FoodLink created QR-coded labels for "clamshell" strawberry containers, which provide information about the specific growing location of the packaged berries, allowing trading partners and consumers to trace the berries back to their source by using a smartphone to scan the code. Cal Giant grows and ships more than 20 million trays of berries annually.

FoodLink recently released this video that further describes the partnership and the benefits that Cal Giant has received from the FoodLink traceability platform.

Shuman Produce promotes its ‘RealSweet’ onions with promotional products

sportula

Shuman Produce in Reidsville, GA, is giving away the ultimate grilling tool, its ‘RealSweet Sportula’ – a multi-use heavy duty spatula – in a spring promotion.

Here, Shuman spokesman The Fat Man, of Chef and The Fatman fame, shows off the sportula – and lets people know how to get their own.

This is part of a series the sweet onion leader has produced to promote its year-round lineup of product from its Vidalia fields and growing operations around the Western Hemisphere.

Agriculture brings science and math to life for North Carolina high school students

nc high school studentsStudents and teachers from high schools in Rowan County, NC, are engaged in a new project that seeks to bring science and math concepts alive through agriculture. They are taking a leap from their textbooks to hands-on learning at an outdoor laboratory with access to world-class researchers.

This video shows how project partners North Carolina State University at the N.C. Research Campus, high schools in Rowan County, and the N.C. Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Piedmont Research Station are working together to make math and science tastier subjects for students.