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“Mushroom blendability is the driving and emerging trend for mushrooms in both foodservice and retail,” said Bart Minor, president of the Mushroom Council. “Mushrooms are on target to make a big impact at foodservice and retail that will improve consumers’ nutrition and maybe improve the cost to prepare some meals. It’s a win for everyone and will change how consumers think of and use mushrooms.”

The blendability cooking technique combines fresh chopped mushrooms with ground meat. The result is dishes with lower calories, sodium and fat.CIAMushrooms-7689Organic mushroom retail sales have doubled over the past two years. But due to mushrooms’ meaty texture and high umami content the texture, flavor and acceptance remain the same.

The foodservice sector has adopted blendability — from chain restaurants to industry operations such as schools and health care. Retailers that want to be on the forefront will consider using blendability in their delis and meat cases as well as educating their customers on blending benefits.

Seasons 52, the fresh grill and wine bar restaurant chain, introduced its version of the mushroom-meat blend and call the Angus beef blended with fresh Cremini mushrooms a work of art. Called Mushroom Duxelle Burger, it is being featured throughout the summer. The chain is owned by Darden, one of the largest foodservice companies in the world.

Macaroni Grill recently launched a signature mushroom blend in its Rustic Kitchen Meatball line that blends fresh, chopped mushrooms with veal, garlic, onions and a Marsala wine sauce. The result is a mouth-watering meatball.

“This is just the latest in the Mushroom Council’s focus on blendability,” said Minor. “Colleges across the country are adopting the technique and adding new mushroom-meat blended products that are nutritious and delicious, and this is just the start. Mushroom blendability has significant opportunities ahead and the potential growth is tremendous.”

Minor pointed out that foodservice operators can explore the cost-saving potential and nutrition benefits of mushroom blendability with the council’s new interactive Blend Calculator, available at www.mushroomsinschools.com/mushroom-blendability-calculator.

Organic mushrooms are also making news with retail sales doubling over the past two years, and increasing by 43 percent for the most recent 52 weeks. Organics now have a 6 percent share of the category.

“A study developed by Dr. John Stanton of Saint Joseph’s University measured the effectiveness of messaging claims on mushroom labels to increase sales,” explained Minor. “The results revealed the ‘picked-fresh daily’ claim to be the second-most-effective incentive for customers to purchase mushrooms. The 100 percent vitamin D and B vitamins in mushrooms were also found to be potential demand purchase drivers.”

He added that mushrooms are considered a staple produce item today, pointing out that nothing can replace the item. They are a low-cost way to instantly upscale a meal. The use of blendability on the foodservice level is resulting in customers incorporating mushrooms into their at-home dining experiences.

The Mushroom Council’s “Swap It or Top It” campaign continues to create buzz. Minor said approximately 50 stores entered its “Swap It or Top It” summer contest, which ended July 15.

“Customized promotions took place in major chains across the country,” he said. “The contest drew attention to the mushroom category in the summer months and reminded consumers to include mushrooms in their grilling events. The contest successfully highlighted mushrooms as the go-to addition for summer barbeques along with other traditional summer produce. Over 100 consumers entered our ‘Swap It or Top It’ recipe contest by blending mushrooms into burgers, shish kebabs and more.”

Since 2002, the council has provided more than $850,000 to City of Hope for research on mushrooms and the fight against cancer. The council will demonstrate its ongoing commitment to breast cancer research by providing $50,000 in 2014 to fund research specific to breast cancer. During the October Pink campaign, the council will again provide labels, stickers and point-of-sale materials for the mushroom industry to help promote the continued commitment to breast cancer prevention research.

“Through this partnership researchers at City of Hope recently shared a video that highlights white button mushrooms as part of a study on post-treatment care for prostate cancer,” said Minor. “This important video highlights the potential for new medicinal uses of mushrooms.”