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Deardorff Family Farms in Oxnard, CA, announced Jan. 14 the introduction of its new "Deardorff Organics" brand. The new label is, according to a company press release, “a showcase of the company's commitment to sustainability, expressed through organic farming and environmentally responsible and recyclable packaging.” The rollout coincides with a fivefold increase in acreage Deardorff has dedicated to certified organic production and an expansion in the number of organic items the company is growing and marketing.

Deardorff has been growing some organic items in limited quantities for about five years, and has had double-digit growth in organic sales for the last three years. But with the winter 2011 season, the company is entering a major growth phase in its organic program, according to Scott Albertson, director of marketing and business development.

Mr. Albertson said Jan. 15 that Deardorff “has begun its process of a real significant material growth phase,” combining “the evolution of [the firm’s] commitment to sustainable farming” with “what is setting up as great opportunities in the marketplace.”

Deardorff has “new land that is coming into organic certification, as well as some leases that have been picked up,” and has hired new people “to manage the organic division of the company,” he said.

Along with that, “we are really excited about what we have been able to do in the last few months of preparing to come into the marketplace with a new label that expresses ultimately our commitment to sustainable agriculture and packaging,” he said. “We put a lot of attention to details in the design” of the new label “to make it really fresh and fun-looking and express visually what we stand for at the farm level.

“Every aspect of the brand has been infused with the company’s commitment to sustainability and to examination of all our resource utilization. It flows through everything,” from the way products are grown to “the materials that make up the packaging.”

The press release said that “ 'Deardorff Organics’ brand packaging materials have been selected for their commitment to resource and environmental sustainability. [C]orrugated materials feature International Paper’s ClimaSeries was-alternative products which are 100 percent recyclable. Cartons made of these materials enable Deardorff’s retail partners to completely recycle all ‘Deardorff Organics’ corrugated packaging.” Celery and lettuce bags “feature the EPI specially modified plastic that assures a much faster and cleaner decomposition in the waste stream.”

Much hard work has gone into developing a planting schedule for the winter harvest, “and we are [now] beginning to harvest our winter set of vegetables and berries and put them into the ‘Deardorff Organics’ label and get them into the marketplace,” Mr. Albertson said.

The new label, he said, will “continue the tradition of some of the Deardorff labels that have become synonymous with great quality of the items that are in them.” On the conventional side, the company’s “Highland Ranch” label “is known as a really great vine-ripe tomato” both domestically and internationally, and the “Sir William” label for celery and other vegetables has a similar reputation.

The new “Deardorff Organics” label is “now the label [with which] we are presenting all of our organic produce,” consisting of a broad line of vegetables and berries.

“We started off with 20-plus items to lay the foundation” of what will be an even broader line with the onset of summer and in future seasons, Mr. Albertson said.

“This year marks an opportunity for us” not only to introduce the expanded line of organic items, in increased volume, and in a new label, but also “to get feedback from customers, to find out what they are looking at,” he said.

“Since 1937, the Deardorff family name has been synonymous with high- quality fresh produce items and sustainable farming and business practices,” according to the press release. “Now in its fourth generation, Deardorff Family Farms continues this tradition with significant expansion of its organic product line.”

The initial expansion will include such items as organic celery broccoli, Romaine, green leaf, red leaf, green cabbage, red cabbage, napa, Bok Choy, baby Bok Choy, spinach, cilantro, collards, daikon, kale, parsley, and several varieties of chards, as well as strawberries. For late winter, spring and summer, vine-ripe Roma and specialty tomatoes and other items will be added to the roster.

The rollout coincides with a fivefold increase in acreage Deardorff has dedicated to certified organic production and an expansion in the number of organic items the company is growing and marketing.

Deardorff has been growing some organic items in limited quantities for about five years, and has had double-digit growth in organic sales for the last three years. But with the winter 2011 season, the company is entering a major growth phase in its organic program, according to Scott Albertson, director of marketing and business development.

Mr. Albertson said Jan. 15 that Deardorff “has begun its process of a real significant material growth phase,” combining “the evolution of [the firm’s] commitment to sustainable farming” with “what is setting up as great opportunities in the marketplace.”

Deardorff has “new land that is coming into organic certification, as well as some leases that have been picked up,” and has hired new people “to manage the organic division of the company,” he said.

Along with that, “we are really excited about what we have been able to do in the last few months of preparing to come into the marketplace with a new label that expresses ultimately our commitment to sustainable agriculture and packaging,” he said. “We put a lot of attention to details in the design” of the new label “to make it really fresh and fun-looking and express visually what we stand for at the farm level.

“Every aspect of the brand has been infused with the company’s commitment to sustainability and to examination of all our resource utilization. It flows through everything,” from the way products are grown to “the materials that make up the packaging.”

Much hard work has gone into developing a planting schedule for the winter harvest, “and we are [now] beginning to harvest our winter set of vegetables and berries and put them into the ‘Deardorff Organics’ label and get them into the marketplace,” Mr. Albertson said.

The new label, he said, will “continue the tradition of some of the Deardorff labels that have become synonymous with great quality of the items that are in them.” On the conventional side, the company’s “Highland Ranch” label “is known as a really great vine-ripe tomato” both domestically and internationally, and the “Sir William” label for celery and other vegetables has a similar reputation.

The new “Deardorff Organics” label is “now the label [with which] we are presenting all of our organic produce,” consisting of a broad line of vegetables and berries.

“We started off with 20-plus items to lay the foundation” of what will be an even broader line with the onset of summer and in future seasons, Mr. Albertson said.

“This year marks an opportunity for us” not only to introduce the expanded line of organic items, in increased volume, and in a new label, but also “to get feedback from customers, to find out what they are looking at,” he said.

“Since 1937, the Deardorff family name has been synonymous with high- quality fresh produce items and sustainable farming and business practices,” according to the press release. “Now in its fourth generation, Deardorff Family Farms continues this tradition with significant expansion of its organic product line.”

The initial expansion will include such items as organic celery broccoli, Romaine, green leaf, red leaf, green cabbage, red cabbage, napa, Bok Choy, baby Bok Choy, spinach, cilantro, collards, daikon, kale, parsley, and several varieties of chards, as well as strawberries. For late winter, spring and summer, vine-ripe Roma and specialty tomatoes and other items will be added to the roster.